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U.S. e-cigarettes caused 805 lung injuries, a 52% increase in a week!According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hundreds of cases of lung injury related to e-cigarettes have occurred across the United States. According to the CDC report, as of Tuesday, there have been 805 confirmed and suspected cases related to e-cigarette use in 46 U.S. states and the U.S. Virgin Islands, a 52% increase from a week ago. This number is higher than the 530 cases reported by the CDC last week. There are currently 13 deaths in 10 states: 2 in California, 2 in Kansas, 2 in Oregon, 1 each in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi. CDC Chief Deputy Secretary-General Anne · Dr. Shukat said at the House Subcommittee hearing on Tuesday that it is expected that the number of diseases related to e-cigarettes reported this week will be hundreds of cases higher than last week. Illinois Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, chairman of the Economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee of the House Supervision and Reform Committee, said that he is now "disheartened" by knowing so many cases. "This shows that 275 lung disease cases have been added in just one week across the United States." Kris Namottosi said in an e-mail statement on Thursday: "This number is worse than we thought. "He is leading the Congress to investigate the prevalence of e-cigarettes among young people. He said: "This sad news strengthened my determination to continue to lead the subcommittee's investigation of the use of e-cigarettes and e-cigarettes by young people in order to curb this growing public health crisis. "The Mississippi Department of Health reported the 12th death in the United States on Thursday. The patient was under 30 years old. This is the first death in the state related to e-cigarettes. Dr. Paul Byers, a state epidemiologist at the Mississippi Department of Health, said in a press release on Thursday: 鈥淭here are too many deaths related to e-cigarettes, and this is completely preventable. "Byers said: "We are sad about this, and hope this helps to emphasize how serious the danger of e-cigarettes is. "So far, Mississippi has found 4 cases of severe lung injury related to e-cigarettes, and all patients are between 18 and 34 years old. Oregon later reported the 13th case death. Governor Kate Brown announced the news and said that the state health agency is urging residents to stop smoking. The specific cause of lung disease throughout the United States is still unknown, but all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette or smoking. According to the CDC, most patients have a history of using e-cigarette products containing THC or tetrahydrocannabinol (the psychoactive substance in cannabis). Many patients report the use of THC and nicotine. Some people report using e-cigarette products that only contain nicotine. According to CDC data, there are 805 cases of lung injury from 46 states and 1 U.S. territory. Twelve people have died in 10 states. CDC has obtained gender and age data for 771 patients. Approximately 69% of patients are men. Nearly two-thirds (62%) of patients are between 18 and 34 years old; 22% of patients are between 18-21 years old. 16% of patients were under 18 years of age. All reported patients have a history of using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes. The latest findings of the investigation of lung damage caused by e-cigarette use or e-cigarette smoking indicate that products containing THC have played a role in this epidemic. The CDC has received data on the use of substances in e-cigarettes or vapor products in 514 patients within 30 days before the onset of symptoms. About 77% of patients reported using THC-containing products; 36% of patients reported using THC-containing products only. About 57% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products; 16% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products only. What CDC still hasn鈥檛 figured out is which specific chemicals can cause lung damage when using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes; no single product or substance is relevant to all lung injury cases; more information is needed Come to understand that one or more e-cigarette products, substances or brands caused the epidemic.

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According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hundreds of cases of lung injury related to e-cigarettes have occurred across the United States. According to the CDC report, as of Tuesday, there have been 805 confirmed and suspected cases related to e-cigarette use in 46 U.S. states and the U.S. Virgin Islands, a 52% increase from a week ago. This number is higher than the 530 cases reported by the CDC last week. There are currently 13 deaths in 10 states: 2 in California, 2 in Kansas, 2 in Oregon, 1 each in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi. CDC Chief Deputy Secretary-General Anne · Dr. Shukat said at the House Subcommittee hearing on Tuesday that it is expected that the number of diseases related to e-cigarettes reported this week will be hundreds of cases higher than last week. Illinois Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, chairman of the Economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee of the House Supervision and Reform Committee, said that he is now "disheartened" by knowing so many cases. "This shows that 275 lung disease cases have been added in just one week across the United States." Kris Namottosi said in an e-mail statement on Thursday: "This number is worse than we thought. "He is leading the Congress to investigate the prevalence of e-cigarettes among young people. He said: "This sad news strengthened my determination to continue to lead the subcommittee's investigation of the use of e-cigarettes and e-cigarettes by young people in order to curb this growing public health crisis. "The Mississippi Department of Health reported the 12th death in the United States on Thursday. The patient was under 30 years old. This is the first death in the state related to e-cigarettes. Dr. Paul Byers, a state epidemiologist at the Mississippi Department of Health, said in a press release on Thursday: 鈥淭here are too many deaths related to e-cigarettes, and this is completely preventable. "Byers said: "We are sad about this, and hope this helps to emphasize how serious the danger of e-cigarettes is. "So far, Mississippi has found 4 cases of severe lung injury related to e-cigarettes, and all patients are between 18 and 34 years old. Oregon later reported the 13th case death. Governor Kate Brown announced the news and said that the state health agency is urging residents to stop smoking. The specific cause of lung disease throughout the United States is still unknown, but all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette or smoking. According to the CDC, most patients have a history of using e-cigarette products containing THC or tetrahydrocannabinol (the psychoactive substance in cannabis). Many patients report the use of THC and nicotine. Some people report using e-cigarette products that only contain nicotine. According to CDC data, there are 805 cases of lung injury from 46 states and 1 U.S. territory. Twelve people have died in 10 states. CDC has obtained gender and age data for 771 patients. Approximately 69% of patients are men. Nearly two-thirds (62%) of patients are between 18 and 34 years old; 22% of patients are between 18-21 years old. 16% of patients were under 18 years of age. All reported patients have a history of using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes. The latest findings of the investigation of lung damage caused by e-cigarette use or e-cigarette smoking indicate that products containing THC have played a role in this epidemic. The CDC has received data on the use of substances in e-cigarettes or vapor products in 514 patients within 30 days before the onset of symptoms. About 77% of patients reported using THC-containing products; 36% of patients reported using THC-containing products only. About 57% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products; 16% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products only. What CDC still hasn鈥檛 figured out is which specific chemicals can cause lung damage when using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes; no single product or substance is relevant to all lung injury cases; more information is needed Come to understand that one or more e-cigarette products, substances or brands caused the epidemic.

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According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hundreds of cases of lung injury related to e-cigarettes have occurred across the United States. According to the CDC report, as of Tuesday, there have been 805 confirmed and suspected cases related to e-cigarette use in 46 U.S. states and the U.S. Virgin Islands, a 52% increase from a week ago. This number is higher than the 530 cases reported by the CDC last week. There are currently 13 deaths in 10 states: 2 in California, 2 in Kansas, 2 in Oregon, 1 each in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi. CDC Chief Deputy Secretary-General Anne · Dr. Shukat said at the House Subcommittee hearing on Tuesday that it is expected that the number of diseases related to e-cigarettes reported this week will be hundreds of cases higher than last week. Illinois Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, chairman of the Economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee of the House Supervision and Reform Committee, said that he is now "disheartened" by knowing so many cases. "This shows that 275 lung disease cases have been added in just one week across the United States." Kris Namottosi said in an e-mail statement on Thursday: "This number is worse than we thought. "He is leading the Congress to investigate the prevalence of e-cigarettes among young people. He said: "This sad news strengthened my determination to continue to lead the subcommittee's investigation of the use of e-cigarettes and e-cigarettes by young people in order to curb this growing public health crisis. "The Mississippi Department of Health reported the 12th death in the United States on Thursday. The patient was under 30 years old. This is the first death in the state related to e-cigarettes. Dr. Paul Byers, a state epidemiologist at the Mississippi Department of Health, said in a press release on Thursday: 鈥淭here are too many deaths related to e-cigarettes, and this is completely preventable. "Byers said: "We are sad about this, and hope this helps to emphasize how serious the danger of e-cigarettes is. "So far, Mississippi has found 4 cases of severe lung injury related to e-cigarettes, and all patients are between 18 and 34 years old. Oregon later reported the 13th case death. Governor Kate Brown announced the news and said that the state health agency is urging residents to stop smoking. The specific cause of lung disease throughout the United States is still unknown, but all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette or smoking. According to the CDC, most patients have a history of using e-cigarette products containing THC or tetrahydrocannabinol (the psychoactive substance in cannabis). Many patients report the use of THC and nicotine. Some people report using e-cigarette products that only contain nicotine. According to CDC data, there are 805 cases of lung injury from 46 states and 1 U.S. territory. Twelve people have died in 10 states. CDC has obtained gender and age data for 771 patients. Approximately 69% of patients are men. Nearly two-thirds (62%) of patients are between 18 and 34 years old; 22% of patients are between 18-21 years old. 16% of patients were under 18 years of age. All reported patients have a history of using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes. The latest findings of the investigation of lung damage caused by e-cigarette use or e-cigarette smoking indicate that products containing THC have played a role in this epidemic. The CDC has received data on the use of substances in e-cigarettes or vapor products in 514 patients within 30 days before the onset of symptoms. About 77% of patients reported using THC-containing products; 36% of patients reported using THC-containing products only. About 57% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products; 16% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products only. What CDC still hasn鈥檛 figured out is which specific chemicals can cause lung damage when using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes; no single product or substance is relevant to all lung injury cases; more information is needed Come to understand that one or more e-cigarette products, substances or brands caused the epidemic.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hundreds of cases of lung injury related to e-cigarettes have occurred across the United States. According to the CDC report, as of Tuesday, there have been 805 confirmed and suspected cases related to e-cigarette use in 46 U.S. states and the U.S. Virgin Islands, a 52% increase from a week ago. This number is higher than the 530 cases reported by the CDC last week. There are currently 13 deaths in 10 states: 2 in California, 2 in Kansas, 2 in Oregon, 1 each in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi. CDC Chief Deputy Secretary-General Anne · Dr. Shukat said at the House Subcommittee hearing on Tuesday that it is expected that the number of diseases related to e-cigarettes reported this week will be hundreds of cases higher than last week. Illinois Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, chairman of the Economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee of the House Supervision and Reform Committee, said that he is now "disheartened" by knowing so many cases. "This shows that 275 lung disease cases have been added in just one week across the United States." Kris Namottosi said in an e-mail statement on Thursday: "This number is worse than we thought. "He is leading the Congress to investigate the prevalence of e-cigarettes among young people. He said: "This sad news strengthened my determination to continue to lead the subcommittee's investigation of the use of e-cigarettes and e-cigarettes by young people in order to curb this growing public health crisis. "The Mississippi Department of Health reported the 12th death in the United States on Thursday. The patient was under 30 years old. This is the first death in the state related to e-cigarettes. Dr. Paul Byers, a state epidemiologist at the Mississippi Department of Health, said in a press release on Thursday: 鈥淭here are too many deaths related to e-cigarettes, and this is completely preventable. "Byers said: "We are sad about this, and hope this helps to emphasize how serious the danger of e-cigarettes is. "So far, Mississippi has found 4 cases of severe lung injury related to e-cigarettes, and all patients are between 18 and 34 years old. Oregon later reported the 13th case death. Governor Kate Brown announced the news and said that the state health agency is urging residents to stop smoking. The specific cause of lung disease throughout the United States is still unknown, but all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette or smoking. According to the CDC, most patients have a history of using e-cigarette products containing THC or tetrahydrocannabinol (the psychoactive substance in cannabis). Many patients report the use of THC and nicotine. Some people report using e-cigarette products that only contain nicotine. According to CDC data, there are 805 cases of lung injury from 46 states and 1 U.S. territory. Twelve people have died in 10 states. CDC has obtained gender and age data for 771 patients. Approximately 69% of patients are men. Nearly two-thirds (62%) of patients are between 18 and 34 years old; 22% of patients are between 18-21 years old. 16% of patients were under 18 years of age. All reported patients have a history of using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes. The latest findings of the investigation of lung damage caused by e-cigarette use or e-cigarette smoking indicate that products containing THC have played a role in this epidemic. The CDC has received data on the use of substances in e-cigarettes or vapor products in 514 patients within 30 days before the onset of symptoms. About 77% of patients reported using THC-containing products; 36% of patients reported using THC-containing products only. About 57% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products; 16% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products only. What CDC still hasn鈥檛 figured out is which specific chemicals can cause lung damage when using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes; no single product or substance is relevant to all lung injury cases; more information is needed Come to understand that one or more e-cigarette products, substances or brands caused the epidemic.

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hundreds of cases of lung injury related to e-cigarettes have occurred across the United States. According to the CDC report, as of Tuesday, there have been 805 confirmed and suspected cases related to e-cigarette use in 46 U.S. states and the U.S. Virgin Islands, a 52% increase from a week ago. This number is higher than the 530 cases reported by the CDC last week. There are currently 13 deaths in 10 states: 2 in California, 2 in Kansas, 2 in Oregon, 1 each in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi. CDC Chief Deputy Secretary-General Anne · Dr. Shukat said at the House Subcommittee hearing on Tuesday that it is expected that the number of diseases related to e-cigarettes reported this week will be hundreds of cases higher than last week. Illinois Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, chairman of the Economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee of the House Supervision and Reform Committee, said that he is now "disheartened" by knowing so many cases. "This shows that 275 lung disease cases have been added in just one week across the United States." Kris Namottosi said in an e-mail statement on Thursday: "This number is worse than we thought. "He is leading the Congress to investigate the prevalence of e-cigarettes among young people. He said: "This sad news strengthened my determination to continue to lead the subcommittee's investigation of the use of e-cigarettes and e-cigarettes by young people in order to curb this growing public health crisis. "The Mississippi Department of Health reported the 12th death in the United States on Thursday. The patient was under 30 years old. This is the first death in the state related to e-cigarettes. Dr. Paul Byers, a state epidemiologist at the Mississippi Department of Health, said in a press release on Thursday: 鈥淭here are too many deaths related to e-cigarettes, and this is completely preventable. "Byers said: "We are sad about this, and hope this helps to emphasize how serious the danger of e-cigarettes is. "So far, Mississippi has found 4 cases of severe lung injury related to e-cigarettes, and all patients are between 18 and 34 years old. Oregon later reported the 13th case death. Governor Kate Brown announced the news and said that the state health agency is urging residents to stop smoking. The specific cause of lung disease throughout the United States is still unknown, but all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette or smoking. According to the CDC, most patients have a history of using e-cigarette products containing THC or tetrahydrocannabinol (the psychoactive substance in cannabis). Many patients report the use of THC and nicotine. Some people report using e-cigarette products that only contain nicotine. According to CDC data, there are 805 cases of lung injury from 46 states and 1 U.S. territory. Twelve people have died in 10 states. CDC has obtained gender and age data for 771 patients. Approximately 69% of patients are men. Nearly two-thirds (62%) of patients are between 18 and 34 years old; 22% of patients are between 18-21 years old. 16% of patients were under 18 years of age. All reported patients have a history of using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes. The latest findings of the investigation of lung damage caused by e-cigarette use or e-cigarette smoking indicate that products containing THC have played a role in this epidemic. The CDC has received data on the use of substances in e-cigarettes or vapor products in 514 patients within 30 days before the onset of symptoms. About 77% of patients reported using THC-containing products; 36% of patients reported using THC-containing products only. About 57% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products; 16% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products only. What CDC still hasn鈥檛 figured out is which specific chemicals can cause lung damage when using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes; no single product or substance is relevant to all lung injury cases; more information is needed Come to understand that one or more e-cigarette products, substances or brands caused the epidemic.

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According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), hundreds of cases of lung injury related to e-cigarettes have occurred across the United States. According to the CDC report, as of Tuesday, there have been 805 confirmed and suspected cases related to e-cigarette use in 46 U.S. states and the U.S. Virgin Islands, a 52% increase from a week ago. This number is higher than the 530 cases reported by the CDC last week. There are currently 13 deaths in 10 states: 2 in California, 2 in Kansas, 2 in Oregon, 1 each in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, Florida, Georgia and Mississippi. CDC Chief Deputy Secretary-General Anne · Dr. Shukat said at the House Subcommittee hearing on Tuesday that it is expected that the number of diseases related to e-cigarettes reported this week will be hundreds of cases higher than last week. Illinois Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, chairman of the Economic and Consumer Policy Subcommittee of the House Supervision and Reform Committee, said that he is now "disheartened" by knowing so many cases. "This shows that 275 lung disease cases have been added in just one week across the United States." Kris Namottosi said in an e-mail statement on Thursday: "This number is worse than we thought. "He is leading the Congress to investigate the prevalence of e-cigarettes among young people. He said: "This sad news strengthened my determination to continue to lead the subcommittee's investigation of the use of e-cigarettes and e-cigarettes by young people in order to curb this growing public health crisis. "The Mississippi Department of Health reported the 12th death in the United States on Thursday. The patient was under 30 years old. This is the first death in the state related to e-cigarettes. Dr. Paul Byers, a state epidemiologist at the Mississippi Department of Health, said in a press release on Thursday: 鈥淭here are too many deaths related to e-cigarettes, and this is completely preventable. "Byers said: "We are sad about this, and hope this helps to emphasize how serious the danger of e-cigarettes is. "So far, Mississippi has found 4 cases of severe lung injury related to e-cigarettes, and all patients are between 18 and 34 years old. Oregon later reported the 13th case death. Governor Kate Brown announced the news and said that the state health agency is urging residents to stop smoking. The specific cause of lung disease throughout the United States is still unknown, but all reported cases have a history of e-cigarette or smoking. According to the CDC, most patients have a history of using e-cigarette products containing THC or tetrahydrocannabinol (the psychoactive substance in cannabis). Many patients report the use of THC and nicotine. Some people report using e-cigarette products that only contain nicotine. According to CDC data, there are 805 cases of lung injury from 46 states and 1 U.S. territory. Twelve people have died in 10 states. CDC has obtained gender and age data for 771 patients. Approximately 69% of patients are men. Nearly two-thirds (62%) of patients are between 18 and 34 years old; 22% of patients are between 18-21 years old. 16% of patients were under 18 years of age. All reported patients have a history of using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes. The latest findings of the investigation of lung damage caused by e-cigarette use or e-cigarette smoking indicate that products containing THC have played a role in this epidemic. The CDC has received data on the use of substances in e-cigarettes or vapor products in 514 patients within 30 days before the onset of symptoms. About 77% of patients reported using THC-containing products; 36% of patients reported using THC-containing products only. About 57% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products; 16% of patients reported using nicotine-containing products only. What CDC still hasn鈥檛 figured out is which specific chemicals can cause lung damage when using e-cigarette products or smoking e-cigarettes; no single product or substance is relevant to all lung injury cases; more information is needed Come to understand that one or more e-cigarette products, substances or brands caused the epidemic.

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U.S. e-cigarettes caused 805 lung injuries, a 52% increase in a week!

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